Last edited by Volkis
Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Resistance Phenomenon in Microbes and Infectious Disease Vectors found in the catalog.

The Resistance Phenomenon in Microbes and Infectious Disease Vectors

Implications for Human Health and Strategies for Containment -- Workshop Summary

by Forum on Emerging Infections

  • 260 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by National Academies Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Infectious & contagious diseases,
  • Medical microbiology & virology,
  • Public health & preventive medicine,
  • Immunosuppression,
  • Microorganisms,
  • Science,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Medical,
  • Infectious Diseases,
  • Microbiology,
  • Public Health,
  • Medical / Diseases,
  • Immunology,
  • Life Sciences - Biology - Microbiology,
  • Communicable Diseases, Emergin,
  • Communicable Diseases, Emerging,
  • Congresses,
  • Drug Resistance, Microbial,
  • Drug resistance in microorgani,
  • Drug resistance in microorganisms,
  • prevention & control

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsStacey L. Knobler (Editor), Stanley M. Lemon (Editor), Marian Najafi (Editor), Tom Burroughs (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages336
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10358707M
    ISBN 100309088542
    ISBN 109780309088541

    The intrinsic properties and taxonomy of aphid-borne viruses are also examined. Comprised of 22 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the importance of aphids as vectors, their biology, and the properties of the viruses they transmit. These introductory chapters prepare the reader for later ones on aphid-virus-plant interactions. Antibiotic Resistance: Implications for Global Health and Novel Intervention Strategies () Saving Lives, Buying Time: Economics of Malaria Drugs in an Age of Resistance () The Resistance Phenomenon in Microbes and Infectious Disease Vectors: Implications for Human Health and Strategies for Containment—Workshop Summary ().

      The resistance among various microbial species (infectious agents) to different antimicrobial drugs has emerged as a cause of public health threat all over the world at a terrifying rate. Due to the pacing advent of new resistance mechanisms and decrease in efficiency of treating common infectious diseases, it results in failure of microbial response to standard treatment, leading to .   This book contains 20 chapters, which are divided into 5 sections. Section 1 covers different aspects of insecticide resistance of selected economically important plant insect pests, whereas section 2 includes chapters about the importance, development and insecticide resistance management in controlling malaria vectors. Section 3 is dedicated to some general questions in insecticide.

    Abstract. Antibiotic resistance and associated genes are ubiquitous and ancient, with most genes that encode resistance in human pathogens having originated in bacteria from the natural environment (eg, β-lactamases and fluoroquinolones resistance genes, such as qnr).The rapid evolution and spread of “new” antibiotic resistance genes has been enhanced by modern human activity and its.   One of these reasons is a phenomenon known as bacterial persistence, the case when bacteria survive the killing action of antibiotics by changing its physiological state. Lyme disease is an infectious disease that can usually be successfully cured by antibiotic therapy at the very early stages of infection, targeting the replicative form of the.


Share this book
You might also like
Texas trivia

Texas trivia

Friend or foe?

Friend or foe?

short-term forecast of U.S. oceanborne exports

short-term forecast of U.S. oceanborne exports

Wheres the Applause?

Wheres the Applause?

Public participation in structure and local planning

Public participation in structure and local planning

Employer aid for postsecondary education

Employer aid for postsecondary education

Johnson on Shakespeare

Johnson on Shakespeare

Handbook of agencies and government departments concerned with the offshore industry

Handbook of agencies and government departments concerned with the offshore industry

Nothing to be afraid of

Nothing to be afraid of

Farewell princess.

Farewell princess.

Spatherbst in Eden

Spatherbst in Eden

Reliability study: auxiliary/emergency feedwater system, 1987-1995

Reliability study: auxiliary/emergency feedwater system, 1987-1995

The Resistance Phenomenon in Microbes and Infectious Disease Vectors by Forum on Emerging Infections Download PDF EPUB FB2

Through invited presentations and participant discussion, the February 6–7,Forum (Institute of Medicine Forum on Emerging Infections) workshop explored the causes and consequences of the resistance phenomenon.

The Forum discussion also examined the scientific evidence supporting current and potential strategies for containment of resistance in microbes, vectors, and animal and Cited by: The Resistance Phenomenon in Microbes and Infectious Disease Vectors: Implications for Human Health and Strategies for Containment: Workshop Summary.

Show details Institute of Medicine (US) Forum on Emerging Infections; Knobler SL, Lemon SM, Najafi M, et al., editors. The Resistance Phenomenon in Microbes and Infectious Disease Vectors examines our understanding of the relationships among microbes, disease vectors, and human hosts, and explores possible new strategies for meeting the challenge of resistance.

The emergence of resistance to therapeutics is not a new phenomenon among microbes—whether viral, bacterial, or protozoan. Following the introduction and subsequent widespread use of penicillin, the first major “miracle” antibiotic, in the early s, microbiologists soon discovered that a number of bacterial The Resistance Phenomenon in Microbes and Infectious Disease Vectors book had become resistant to this antibiotic.

The evolution of antibiotic resistance is becoming not only a clinical problem for the therapy of infectious diseases, and hence for the progress of medicine, the effect of antibiotics on the microbiosphere might also result in unexpected global ecological effects, producing changes in the structure of bacterial and mobile genetic elements.

Ending the War Metaphor: The Changing Agenda for Unraveling the Host-Microbe Relationship—Workshop Summary () The Resistance Phenomenon in Microbes and Infectious Disease Vectors: Implications for Human Health and Strategies for Containment—Workshop Summary () View full source library.

Get this from a library. The resistance phenomenon in microbes and infectious disease vectors: implications for human health and strategies for containment: workshop summary. [Stacey Knobler; Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Forum on Emerging Infections.;]. Control of insect vectors is often the best and sometimes the only way to protect the population from these destructive diseases.

This chapter reviews vector genetics of three of the most important vector-borne diseases that have much to contribute to understanding vector-borne disease epidemiology and to designing successful control methods.

The Resistance Phenomenon in Microbes and Infectious Disease Vectors: Implications for Human Health and Strategies for Containment—Workshop Summary () The emergence of mysterious new diseases, such as SARS, and the looming threat of bioterrorist attacks remind us of how vulnerable we can be to infectious agents.

NCEH provides leadership to promote health and quality of life by preventing or controlling those diseases, birth defects, or disabilities resulting from interaction between people and the environment. Site has information/education resources on a broad range of topics, including asthma, birth defects, radiation, sanitation, lead in blood, and more.

Biofilm is a slime layer that can form around certain bacteria and confer resistance to phagocytosis and antibiotics. It develops around Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis and around coagulase-negative staphylococci on synthetic medical devices, such as IV catheters, prosthetic vascular grafts, and suture material.

bacteria, viruses, and fungi) that enter the body, multiply, and can cause an infection. • Some infectious diseases are contagious (or communicable), that is, spread from one person to another.

•ther infectious diseases can be spread by germs carried in O air, water, food, or soil. They can also be spread by vectors (like biting insects) or. MID 1 2) Capsule: This polysaccharide outer coating of the bacterial surface often plays a role in preventing phagocytosis of bacteria.

3) Peptidoglycan (cell wall) Provides bacterial shape and cell wall consists of alternating units of N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylmuramic acid. Resistance is an ecological phenomenon stemming from the response of bacteria to the widespread use of antibiotics and their presence in the environment.

While determining the consequences of inaction on the present and future public health, we must work to remedy the lack of action in the past. Most bacteria have multiple routes to resistance to any drug and, once resistant, can rapidly give rise to vast numbers of resistant progeny.

Natural selection favors mechanisms that confer resistance with the least fitness cost and those strains that are least burdened by their resistance. /S(03) /S(03) The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria occurred very soon after the first antibiotics (penicillin & streptomycin) were made available by prescription.

Resistance to the growing list of “sulfa” drugs was established, as was resistance to insecticides used to control a variety of insect vectors. The Resistance phenomenon in microbes and infectious disease vectors implications for human health and strategies for containment: workshop summary / Published: () Epigenetics of Infectious Diseases / Published: ().

An enormous variety of organisms exist, including some which can survive and even develop in the body of people or animals.

If the organism can cause infection, it is an infectious agent. In this manual infectious agents which cause infection and illness are called pathogens. Diseases caused by pathogens, or the. Vector-borne diseases are responsible for a substantial portion of the global disease burden causing ∼ million deaths annually (Campbell-Lendrum et al., ; Figure ) and 17% of the entire disease burden caused by parasitic and infectious diseases (Townson et al., ).Control of insect vectors is often the best, and sometimes the only, way to protect the population from these.

Drug resistance is the reduction in effectiveness of a medication such as an antimicrobial or an antineoplastic in treating a disease or condition. The term is used in the context of resistance that pathogens or cancers have "acquired", that is, resistance has evolved.

Antimicrobial resistance and antineoplastic resistance challenge clinical care and drive research. The book Our Stolen Future was important because it _____. was the first book to dispute claims in Rachel Carson's book Silent Spring was the first book that discussed environmental problems with DDT was the first book that discussed water pollution problems in Lake Apopka is credited with starting the environmental movement in the United States.The use of nanotechnology is currently the most promising strategy to overcome microbial drug resistance.

This book shows how, due to their small size, nanoparticles can surmount existing drug resistance mechanisms, including decreased uptake and increased efflux of the drug from the microbial cell, biofilm formation, and intracellular bacteria.resistance.

How do Pathogens Find and Enter the Plant? For a microbe to cause disease, it needs to come into direct contact with its host plant, and often with a specific host plant tissue.

Microbes are passively distributed from plant to plant by wind, splashing rains, or insect vectors (Figure 3). However.